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Upcoming Changes for Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans

A Medicare supplement insurance plan, also known as a Medigap or Med Supp plan, is purchased in combination with original Medicare to help pay out-of-pocket costs not covered by original Medicare. As of Dec. 31, 2018, nearly 13.6 million people were covered by Med Supp plans, representing nearly a 4% increase from the previous year.…

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The Growing Popularity of Annuities

Annuities are nothing new; in fact, they’ve been around since Roman times, and maybe even before that.1 But they’re seeing a modern-day surge in popularity, fueled by pre-retirees and retirees concerned about stock market volatility and outliving their retirement income. The fixed annuity market experienced significant growth between 2017 and 2018, with a 25 percent increase…

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The Millennial Effect

Recessions have consequences, and the Great Recession of 2008 may have produced one of the most influential consequences of all: the millennial mindset. Because of their early experiences in the “real world,” this generation is poised to have long-term significance — comparable to baby boomers — in work, play and politics. If you think boomers…

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Where is Dad’s Money?

Imagine if, sadly, Dad dies or becomes incapacitated. You’re in charge of handling all his financial affairs, from managing his investments to putting income sources in place for Mom. There’s just one problem: He was an old-school guy who never consolidated his assets or set up online accounts. Also, it appears he worked with different…

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Quick Income Ideas

The Federal Reserve recently reported that four out of 10 American adults surveyed said they would struggle to pay for an unexpected expense of $400 or more.1 This revelation goes against the common financial advice urging adults to have three to six months of expenses saved in an accessible account for emergencies.2 Nearly everyone has multiple…

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Pros and Cons of Legislative Inertia

While the 2020 presidential election gains steam, it seems that the passion for new legislation has taken a backseat. As of July 1, the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives had passed 169 bills this year1 while the Republican-dominated Senate had passed 61.2 Unfortunately, as of the same date, this divided impasse had produced only 24 enacted bills since…

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Midyear Outlook

Kiplinger recently noted that the U.S. stock market appeared more resilient than ever, having bounced back from a devastating end of 2018. Employment remains relatively steady, inflation flat and the Fed has indicated reticence to increasing interest rates through the end of the year. In fact, the only headwinds for the rest of the year…

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Beginners Stage

As you begin the retirement planning process, it’s important to have a strategic income plan with regard to Social Security benefits. It is particularly important for married couples to consider not only when the primary breadwinner should begin drawing benefits but also how that start date could affect a spouse whose benefit is derived from…

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The More You Know

One of the first discussions a young couple may have when starting a family is about affordability. How will they pay for child care? Will one spouse quit their job to stay home and raise the child? Here are a couple of interesting facts that may enter that equation:1 The average income for first-time mothers…

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Assessing Your Mortgage Situation in Retirement

When it comes to retirement preparation, a common benchmark goal is having one’s mortgage paid off. This typically removes a large, ongoing payment from the budget and can reduce retirement expenses substantially. Some people even schedule their retirement just after their final payment date. Here’s an even better idea: Schedule your retirement date six months…

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